Category

Art

Category

Internationally exhibited artist and Palm Island Aboriginal elder, Billy Doolan has exhibited and led cultural programmes across Australian and the world. Sharing inspirational messages and his artistic talents and techniques, he continues to educate students, dignitaries and art fans on the importance of caring for the environment. His influence has reached as far as Hong Kong and Sicilly as-well-as across many parts of Australia. Billy Doolan – Patterns of Life, opens this Saturday June 23…

The 1957 Arthur Boyd painting Shearers Playing for a Bride is the most powerful and emotionally moving work I’ve ever seen – it’s haunted me for over 40 years. It is one of the 30 paintings of his Love, Marriage and Death of a Half-caste series, commonly known as the ‘Bride series’. It’s a deeply personal response to the dispossessed, detribalised Aboriginal peoples – victims of the ill-fated assimilation program of 1930 – that he…

Milawa Gourmet Region’s Off Centre Gallery to Plate up a Ceramic Arts Feast this Winter On the Queen’s Birthday long weekend 2018, Friday to Monday, June 8 to 11, Off Centre Gallery will celebrate winter with a full-scale winter-themed dining setting showcasing English born, Sydney-based ceramicist Katherine Mahoney’s contemporary functional wares. Off Centre Gallery will also present a special ‘meet the artist’ event on Saturday, June 9. Katherine produces outstanding functional wares – plates, cups,…

Maureen Morrangulu Thompson, one of Australia’s most gifted Aboriginal artists, knows how to excite viewers, telling uniquely detailed stories within her paintings. One of my personal favourites, Burial Ground Place, 2004 (featured above), comprises many elements, a beautifully assembled kaleidoscope of colours that fit together like a complex jigsaw puzzle. Within the folds can be seen spirit figures, unusual faces, ceremonial dance, flowers, mountains, treetops, foliage, rivers, birds and animals – all here, existing as…

Victorian artist Jim van Geet has a long-term vision – to slowly grow an art business that educates people on their own level and at their own pace. Visitors who stop along the Great Alpine Road touring route to explore the area tend to ask questions soon after entering his gallery. ‘Painting is essentially about light and composition,’ says Jim. ‘The more you look at a painting, the more you discover how the better artists…

Dhungala: A  landmark launch exhibition featuring Latje Latje and Yorta Yorta artists Trevor ‘Turbo’ Brown and Craig Charles. A strong sense of togetherness and a feeling of peace and pleasure comes from viewing the collection of works by Victorian Aboriginal painters Trevor ‘Turbo’ Brown and Craig Charles. Both artists have strong family and spiritual connections to the expansive Murray river region – Dhungala as the river is known in Yorta Yorta language. The exhibition shares…

Every three months for the past 40 years I’ve visited my good friend the great artist Asher Bilu to get a fix – art fix, that is. He’s always got something new that takes me on a journey. Asher’s now into his 80s, but is brighter, stronger and more energetic than any young pups in the art world today. To me he’s the greatest living artist, his only match in history Van Gogh. Both worked…

TOP: Jim van Geet, The Jury Whisperer (Charles Waterstreet), 2015  90 x 150cm, oil on linen Victorian artist Jim van Geet gathers background and visual evidence on his portrait subjects before tackling brush and canvas. He says of Australian barrister, author, theatre and film producer Charles Waterstreet, that he ‘met with him, over several days in his Sydney chambers’ to gather inspiration and research for the painting. ‘During this time, a procession of clients were…

Just before his death, Vincent van Gogh said to his beloved brother Theo, ‘La tristesse durera toujours’ ­– the sadness will last forever. And many well-known facts of the artist’s life – his complex and debilitating mental illness, an inability to exist comfortably within the world, the long string of failed careers and relationships – seem to reinforce such a view. But what they don’t reflect is Van Gogh’s extraordinary vitality and profound spiritual devotion…

TOP: Beryl Gay: Of Rugged Mountain Ranges (detail), 2015 Oil on stretched canvas 60 x 150cm Visitors to artist Jim van Geet’s new Myrtleford Contemporary Art Gallery have labelled it a surprising oasis, a gift, a rare needle-in-a-haystack find. I can wholeheartedly agree with this sentiment: it’s a major experience to visit the shopfront gallery, where a wealth of hugely varied work is on display. There is gold displayed on these walls and I encourage…

It’s three-quarters the way through November, and we’ve finally got a decent day down on the Peninsula. Twenty-six degrees in Blairgowrie and Sorrento, 30 in Melbourne, and 35 in my old home-town, Benalla. So why not, I thought, go and check out the spot where my old mate John Perceval painted Ocean beach, Sorrento, 1957. It was only yesterday during a conversation with noted freelance curator Rodney James that I discovered this work was in…

Louis XIV, the Sun King, is famous for creating the glittering palace of Versailles and committing its court to a life of unbridled decadence. Louis liked cleaning his teeth with wine, bestowing favour on courtiers by allowing them to wipe his royal bottom, and fathering illegitimate children – about a dozen in all. He was also addicted to fashion. The king’s sartorial whims were frequent, fleeting and expensive, and the whole court had to keep…

For as far back as I can remember, Van Gogh and Monet were my favourites; Degas never got a look-in until a happenstance compelled me. Tolarno Galleries in St Kilda, run by suave Frenchman Georges Mora, was my artistic home from 1969  till 1979. Georges also owned Tolarno restaurant, part of the gig and a generous meal ticket for me – lunch, dinner, and quite often afternoon tea. Natasha Kirsta lived upstairs, and once a…

For love of Australian shearing sheds, and the golden light that is showcased in many of Australia’s iconic paintings, artist Ivan Durrant shears shares the shed dream. My opinion of this historic and heroic painting, and of Tom Robert’s relevance, has varied spectacularly over time. In the last two years of high school, my art teacher prattled on about the importance of Tom Roberts and how his Shearing of the rams told us so much about…

Bryony Nainby gives the great heavy door a heave with her shoulder and it slowly slides open. The Benalla Art Gallery director walks into the vault that guards the city’s art collection. On every rack and in every storage bin are the most important names of Australian art. In a corner stands Howard Arkley and Juan Davila’s famed installation Blue Chip Instant Decorator – a Room, including a chair airbrushed in classic Arkley manner. An…

Richard Estes, Downtown, 1978, Oil on Canvas, 122 x 152 cm Photo © museum moderner kunst stiftung ludwig wien Loan by Österreichischen Ludwig Stiftung An Austrian exhibition of Super Realist art was a massive  back-to-the-future headblast for artist Ivan Durrant, who reminisces about the wild child SoHo heyday of a great art movement. It was the end of 1975 and the leading American Super Realists, Chuck Close and Janet Fish, had just exhibited at Tolarno…

Whatever took me so long: I’d been a fan of Chrissy Amphlett and Divinyls since the release of their 1983 Monkey Grip EP, yet it took me until the summer of 1988-9 to see Chrissy live on her Temperamental tour at The Sevens Creek Run Woolshed auditorium at Euroa. It was a hot, balmy night, so the outdoor seating, even with the odd mosquito, was perfect. The band started with a slow heartbeat guitar rhythm…

A historically significant and brilliantly emotive exhibition, Delinquent Angel: John Perceval’s Ceramic Angels, is now on show at Shepparton Art Museum (SAM). Bringing together a remarkable collection of 38 of John Perceval’s ceramic angel sculptures for the first time since they were originally exhibited in 1958 and 1959, this landmark exhibition draws three works from SAM’s nationally significant ceramics collection. At the launch on August 30, Alice Perceval, one of John’s three daughters, reflected on…

It’s often been said: ‘To be successful in business you need to have skin in the game’ – something to lose. I’ve always believed that to make a good painting an artist must leave blood on the canvas – commit fully by exposing inner thought and feeling, risking the danger of misunderstanding and ridicule. Looking at the National Gallery of Australia’s latest Arthur Boyd exhibition, Agony and Ecstasy, there’s no doubt Arthur needed a complete…

Australia’s newest art prize, and one of its richest, was delivered on a stormy night in Benalla this autumn. More than 300 people braved wind and rain to view the 32 finalists in the inaugural Benalla Nude Art Prize and hear the winner announced: the Chilean/Australian artist Juan Davila’s After Image, &. Benalla Nude celebrates the naked human figure depicted in oil, acrylic, watercolour or mixed media by an Australian citizen or resident. The inaugural…

Fred Williams visited the Pilbara region of Western Australia for the first time in May 1979 at the invitation of his friend Sir Roderick Carnegie, then Chairman of CRA (now Rio Tinto Limited). He was so inspired by the unique qualities of this landscape and the possibilities it presented for his art that he visited again in early June of that year. By mid-June, he had produced a large number of gouaches depicting the dramatic…

Sometime in the mid-1980s is when it hit me… I’d walked into Tolarno Galleries in River Street, South Yarra, to view Albert Tucker’s latest exhibition, Faces I have Met. I was blown away, thrilled and overwhelmed with excitement because Tucker – Bert, as I respectfully call him – was always my favourite artist, and seeing his new direction, all portraits, of people I had also met, gifted me an important lesson in what art’s all…

To walk inside the home of artist Asher Bilu and his wife, Luba, is the stuff of considerable wonder. Known for large works of abstraction, Asher’s authentic Victorian Brighton abode acts as an informal survey of his creations, ranging right through from his very first painting in 1958, which hangs on the wall of the front study.  It’s hard to know which way to turn when entering the Bilu home. An Alice in Wonderland chequerboard…